Unearthing CREST: CIA's Declassified Archives

After our three-year lawsuit led to the public release of 13 million pages of declassified CIA records, we've begun a daily-deep dive into the depths of the Agency's seven-decade history.

Support Emma Best's work

Share Embed Help

If you enjoy Best’s work unearthing CIA and FBI history, please consider a one-time or recurring donation.

Backed by Michael Morisy, William Green, Nathan Lawrence, Jack McCaslin, and 7 others.

$320.00 raised out of $575.00.

Embed Opening and closing brackets with a diagonal slash through the middle. Embed

Close

Success Thank you!

Subscribe to MuckRock’s newsletter:

Help this crowdfund find more supporters:

Error Error

An error occurred during payment (don't worry, your card has not been charged).

Refresh the page to try again. If the error persists, contact us.

Background

Our three year saga to release 13 million pages of CIA secrets

Projects

Help build a comprehensive timeline of CIA’s history

CIA World Tour: What has the Agency done in your country?

Resources

The ultimate guide to searching CIA’s declassified archives

How to use exemption codes to find the most interesting documents hidden in the CIA archives

World Tour Guides

Asia-Pacific

Central and South America

Eastern Europe and Eurasia

Northern, Southern, and Western Europe

Near East

Sub-Saharan Africa

Image via CIA’s Flickr

263 Articles

The CIA had a policy of ignoring declassification requirements

The CIA had a policy of ignoring declassification requirements

While a number of declassification programs and requirements have historically been in place at the Central Intelligence Agency, its responses to these programs has been mixed at best. One study in the CIA’s declassified archives is extremely optimistic, stating up front that it assumes the Agency would fully implement the intent of the declassification programs. In a stark contrast, another memo revealed that “for many years,” the CIA had no continuing declassification review program - and other policies and guidelines declared that the Agency’s records were simply exempt from declassification.

Read More

The CIA Word of the Day: Papyrophile

The CIA Word of the Day: Papyrophile

A document uncovered in the Central Intelligence Agency’s declassified archives shows the mid-century Records Management team had a little fun with the Agency’s affinity for paperwork.

Read More

The CIA and the State Department conspired to exploit a bureaucratic loophole to keep records hidden

The CIA and the State Department conspired to exploit a bureaucratic loophole to keep records hidden

In 1955, the Central Intelligence Agency’s Psychological and Paramilitary Operations Staff made some inquiries through their point of contact at the State Department about the storage and accessibility of records concerning CIA operations. When they didn’t receive the answer they wanted, an informal suggestion led to a formal policy to circumvent those requirements by manipulating technicalities and appearances, and in some cases ignoring the records even existed.

Read More

View all...