The CIA’s guide to the greatest female spies in American history

For Women’s History Week in 1984, the Agency prepared a presentation on “The Role of Women in Intelligence”

Written by JPat Brown
Edited by Michael Morisy

Back when it was still just Women’s History Week, the CIA decided to commemorate the occasion with a day-long symposium on “the role of women in intelligence,” including a brief history lesson on pivotal female spies.

Among the famous figures featured by the agency are …

Patience Wright, who went by the sweet nickname “The Promethean Modeler” …

Lydia Darragh, who didn’t give a dang …

Harriet Tubman, whose Drunk History segment you should really watch if you haven’t already …

Claire Phillips, who was like a real-life Rick from Casablanca minus the moping around not doing anything …

and Virginia Hall, who was the doing the whole “journalists in the resistance” thing before it was cool.

While that’s a nice list, and it’d be even nicer to say that it ends there, it doesn’t. The CIA, being the CIA, then devote a full page towards praising Rose O’Neal Greenhow, a hero to the Confederacy.

Read the full presentation embedded below.


Image via Wikimedia Commons