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This week’s FOIA round-up: Agency attempts at transparency hit road bumps

This week’s FOIA round-up: Agency attempts at transparency hit road bumps

In this week’s FOIA round-up, we take a look at experiments with transparency in Florida, Oregon, and Wisconsin that have recently hit road bumps.

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Court rules Tennessee can’t withhold public records just because of a criminal investigation

Court rules Tennessee can’t withhold public records just because of a criminal investigation

Last week, the Tennessee Court of Appeals ruled that state agencies can’t withhold public records just because they’re relevant to a criminal investigation.

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We’re hiring: Come use transparency, journalism and technology to strengthen our democracy

We’re hiring: Come use transparency, journalism and technology to strengthen our democracy

Over the past decade, MuckRock has grown from a simple records request tool to a network of open source platforms that help journalists, researchers, and the public better understand how the world around them works. Help define our next ten years with one of two positions we’ll be hiring for in the coming months.

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This week’s FOIA round-up: Interior was interested in FBI’s "gold standard" FOIA policy, AP collects data on medical marijuana cards, and an Arkansas judge rules clerk broke public records law

This week’s FOIA round-up: Interior was interested in FBI’s “gold standard” FOIA policy, AP collects data on medical marijuana cards, and an Arkansas judge rules clerk broke public records law

In this week’s FOIA round-up, the Department of the Interior staff emails show employees were interested in the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s “500-page per month” policy, the Associated Press created a new dataset by collecting information from each state to see why people wanted a medical marijuana card, and an Arkansas judge rules that a clerk broke state public-records laws, but cites as extenuating circumstances the clerk was acting on advice that they had received from state judicial authorities.

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Requester’s Voice: The Washington Post’s Steven Rich

Requester’s Voice: The Washington Post’s Steven Rich

Steven Rich, the database editor for the investigations team at The Washington Post, recently gained access to a database that traced every pain pill distributed across the US between 2006 and 2012. The database provides a look at where opioids have been distributed by which pharmaceutical companies, and shows that the federal government has long been aware of the scope of the opioid crisis. Rich spoke to MuckRock about taking advantage of a lawsuit to gain access to the Drug Enforcement Administration pain pill database and how to use public records to report on private companies.

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