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DIA cafeteria complaints lend credence to former deputy director’s "bad food" excuse

DIA cafeteria complaints lend credence to former deputy director’s “bad food” excuse

After a 2016 Inspector General report in which Defense Intelligence Agency Deputy Director David Shedd defended his use of a government-issued vehicle to travel to and from restaurants by arguing that trips were necessitated by the poor food quality in the DIA cafeteria, JPat Brown filed a FOIA for the agency cafeteria complaints. After three years of processing, the DIA released 110 pages of responsive records - the most horrifying of which make it sound like Shedd might have had a point.

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Remembering the burglary that broke COINTELPRO

Remembering the burglary that broke COINTELPRO

On the 48th anniversary of the break-in at the Federal Bureau of Investigation’s Media, Pennsylvania field office, reporter Betty Medsger reflects on the role of whistleblowers in the pursuit of truth and government transparency.

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UPDATED: Police warn against the dangers of marijuana candy, but report no incidents

UPDATED: Police warn against the dangers of marijuana candy, but report no incidents

Public agencies’ annual Halloween candy notices are prevalent across social media and news publications. Marijuana candy, in particular, increasingly dominates fearful headlines ahead of the holiday as more states legalize recreational use of the drug.

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This week’s round-up: the art of the appeal

This week’s round-up: the art of the appeal

One public university deals with a looming lawsuit for releasing documents, journalists appeal for records from another state school, and a judge rules that officials’ public statements aren’t … well, official.

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The █████ Gazes Also: Kicking off Sunshine Week 2018

The █████ Gazes Also: Kicking off Sunshine Week 2018

As we kick off what will hopefully be a very transparent Sunshine Week 2018, we want to take a moment to reflect on one of the more absurd finds in the Central Intelligence Agency’s declassified archive so far, and how the work the #OpenGov community can find itself part of the public record.

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