5671 Tags

surveillance

5 Projects

View all...

Street Level Surveillance: Biometrics FOIA Campaign

Police departments are increasingly tracking your face, your fingerprints, your tattoos — and even your DNA. Help the Electronic Frontier Foundation and MuckRock uncover how local agencies are tracking you and bring some much-needed transparency to the murky world of biometric surveillance.

Learn more

The Spy In Your Pocket

Cell phone surveillance technology has outpaced policy and public awareness. MuckRock is investigating precisely how law enforcement across the country use cell phones to locate and track individuals.

Learn more

CVE Watch

The programs being designed and implemented across the country under the auspices of Countering Violent Extremism (CVE) have drawn fire from Muslim community members and civil rights activists. They are criticized for unfairly targeting Muslims, being used for surveillance under the pretext of community outreach, and being based on an unfounded theory of radicalization. Despite the heavy criticism CVE has been subjected to, there remain lingering questions about precisely which communities are targeted, what research (and which experts) agencies are relying on for their approaches, how (or if) government agencies are planning to safeguard civil liberties, which community leaders are being supported and for what reasons, etc. By making the relevant government documents public, we hope to help answer some of these questions.

Learn more

Cell Site Simulator Census

A nationwide census of cellphone surveillance equipment use and policy.

Learn more

Street-Level Surveillance: ALPR Campaign

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and MuckRock have a launched a new public records campaign to reveal how much data law enforcement agencies have collected using automated license plate readers and are sharing with each other. Follow along with the requests on this page.

Learn more

103 Articles

View all...

Data Driven: Explore how cops are collecting and sharing our travel patterns using automated license plate readers

Data Driven: Explore how cops are collecting and sharing our travel patterns using automated license plate readers

The Electronic Frontier Foundation and MuckRock have filed hundreds of public records requests with law enforcement agencies around the country to reveal how data collected from automated license plate readers is used to track the travel patterns of drivers. Today we are releasing records obtained from 200 agencies, accounting for more than 2.5 -billion license plate scans in 2016 and 2017.

Read More

What We Learned

What We Learned

Our research shows that 173 agencies from 23 states and the federal government accounted for roughly 2.5 -billion license plate scans in 2016 and 2017. The remaining 27 agencies refused to turn over reports on how much data they collected.

Read More

Introduction

Introduction

Fewer symbols in America represent a sense of freedom more than an automobile on the open roadway. But in recent years, law enforcement and private companies have developed new technologies to automatically document our comings and goings and where we go in between. Today, police can access vast databases to search our travel patterns with just a few keyboard strokes.

Read More

Understanding the Source Documents

Understanding the Source Documents

Part of our strategy with this public records campaign was to seek two separate, uniform classes of documents easily exportable through Vigilant Solutions’ LEARN system. We provided each agency with a guide to producing these records straight from the user manual, which had been obtained through open records law by Mike Katz-Lacabe of the Center for Human Rights and Privacy. Most agencies were able to follow these instructions and provide the standardized records. Some did not and require a little work to decipher.

Read More

Download the ALPR Dataset

Download the ALPR Dataset

We have also provided the entire dataset as a CSV file that can be reviewed in various software programs, such as Microsoft Excel and Google Sheets. The spreadsheet is far more sortable than the table and includes various tabs that give greater information about each of the different fields.

Read More

97 Requests

View all...

1 Question

View all...

Better information