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Five of the strangest theories in Albert Einstein's FBI file

Five of the strangest theories in Albert Einstein’s FBI file

As one of the most prominent figures of the 20th Century - not to mention an ardent pacifist during the height of the Cold War - it’s not altogether surprising that Albert Einstein’s Federal Bureau of Investigation file stretches several thousand pages. But while Einstein’s sharp critique of U.S. policy at home and abroad gave the J. Edgar Hoover’s Bureau plenty to work with, some of the other concerns raised in the file were dubious at best. At worst, there were Nazi death beams.

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The wit, wisdom, and "whistling shrimp" of Nikita Khrushchev

The wit, wisdom, and “whistling shrimp” of Nikita Khrushchev

Unsurprisingly, the Central Intelligence Agency’s declassified archives show the Agency closely monitored the public statements of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev, grouping them into categories from general “destruction of capitalism” lines to “atypically harsh statements.” Somewhat more surprisingly, one of those categories was “colorful statements,” which covered all the times no one was quite sure what Khrushchev was talking about - including his infamous “whistling shrimp” metaphor.

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As part its psychic research, the CIA explored claims of Soviet superweapons

As part its psychic research, the CIA explored claims of Soviet superweapons

As part of its ongoing psychic research in the ’80s, the Central Intelligence Agency explored the ideas of notorious “free energy” advocate Tom Bearden, according to one of Bearden’s papers discovered in the CREST archives by Mike Lewinski. In particular, the Agency was interested in “STAR WARS NOW!,” Bearden’s warning of Soviet weaponization of electromagnetic fields to create superweapons such as the “Tesla Howitzer.”

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The Cold War comes to Cornell: The FBI's fight to safeguard Hans Bethe's atomic secrets

The Cold War comes to Cornell: The FBI’s fight to safeguard Hans Bethe’s atomic secrets

After World War II, the grandfather of the atomic bomb, Hans Bethe, returned to the quiet college town of Ithaca, New York to resume his research. International spies, intent on reshaping the global balance of power, would soon follow.

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A counterintelligence success years in the making was framed as a lucky break fueled by drunk driving

A counterintelligence success years in the making was framed as a lucky break fueled by drunk driving

The Federal Bureau of Investigation file on Oleg Lyalin offers new insight into what’s been called “the single biggest action taken against Moscow by any western government” - the 1971 expulsion of dozens of Soviet personnel. According to the narrative established at the time, and repeated even in recent publications, Lyalin’s defection “led to the discovery and deportation of 105 Soviet officials who were accused of spying in Britain” and was prompted by a drunk driving arrest. As his FBI file shows, however, the real story is more complicated than that and has long been one of MI-5’s closely held secrets.

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