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The CIA gave Congress a report on the JFK assassination that was edited to remove human rights violations - and mention of JFK

The CIA gave Congress a report on the JFK assassination that was edited to remove human rights violations - and mention of JFK

As a result of the JFK Assassination Records Collection Act, the Central Intelligence Agency ostensibly produced a copy of the Hart Report, more famously known as the “Monster Plot,” which was intended to be a definitive account of the Yuri Nosenko affair and a takedown of disgraced spymaster James Angleton. What the CIA actually released, however, resembles Hart’s actual report as much as the television edit of The Big Lebowski resembles the actual dialogue.

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How FOIA exposed the CIA’s false claim that FOIA helped Soviet spies more than American journalists

How FOIA exposed the CIA’s false claim that FOIA helped Soviet spies more than American journalists

After the government claimed that FOIA was more useful to Soviet spies than American journalists or citizens, American journalists and citizens were able to use FOIA to expose the “apparently groundless” nature of these charges.

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‘50s CIA report critical of Soviet police techniques has eerie parallels to the modern American criminal justice system

‘50s CIA report critical of Soviet police techniques has eerie parallels to the modern American criminal justice system

In the midst of the Cold War, the Central Intelligence Agency routinely collected information about the methods of control employed by the Soviet Union to capture, incarcerate, and punish those opposed to the state. While the CIA used this information to denounce the USSR in reports such as this one available in the CREST archives, a modern reader will note how several of the criticized policies resemble those of the criminal justice system in modern day America.

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A counterintelligence success years in the making was framed as a lucky break fueled by drunk driving

A counterintelligence success years in the making was framed as a lucky break fueled by drunk driving

The Federal Bureau of Investigation file on Oleg Lyalin offers new insight into what’s been called “the single biggest action taken against Moscow by any western government” - the 1971 expulsion of dozens of Soviet personnel. According to the narrative established at the time, and repeated even in recent publications, Lyalin’s defection “led to the discovery and deportation of 105 Soviet officials who were accused of spying in Britain” and was prompted by a drunk driving arrest. As his FBI file shows, however, the real story is more complicated than that and has long been one of MI-5’s closely held secrets.

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No, CIA's counterintelligence chief didn’t mastermind a JFK assassination cover-up weeks in advance

No, CIA’s counterintelligence chief didn’t mastermind a JFK assassination cover-up weeks in advance

In the 2008 epilogue to his book Oswald and the CIA, John Newman begins with a relatively simple fact and ends with a conclusion that not only reaches far beyond the evidence - it contradicts it. While it’s reasonable to point out the Central Intelligence Agency’s determination to avoid being dragged into World War III by the suspicion Lee Harvey Oswald was working for the Russians, it’s quite unreasonable to use this as evidence of a massive cover-up premeditated weeks in advance by none other than CIA counterintelligence chief James Angleton.

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Awaiting Response

Kennedropov CIA

Emma Best sent this request to the Central Intelligence Agency of the United States of America