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algorithmic control

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As facial recognition begins to face regulatory scrutiny, industry and privacy advocates spar over who owns your data

As facial recognition begins to face regulatory scrutiny, industry and privacy advocates spar over who owns your data

As governments build smart cities and businesses deploy commercial tools, the commercial potential of facial recognition is competing with civil liberty concerns and protections for individuals’ private information.

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After early detours, algorithmic bus routing heads for more schools

After early detours, algorithmic bus routing heads for more schools

Two years after Boston Public Schools faced parental backlash over an algorithm to improve bus routing, school districts are looking to give the software another chance, drawn by potential to save millions.

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Five cities, five different approaches to algorithms in government

Five cities, five different approaches to algorithms in government

We looked at five cities and the steps and policies that are bringing new technology to city hall.

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Faced with spikes in child abuse reports, one Pennsylvania county turns to algorithms for triaging safety

Faced with spikes in child abuse reports, one Pennsylvania county turns to algorithms for triaging safety

For five years, officials at the Department of Human Services in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania have been working on a tool to triage calls made to the county’s child protection services hotline, one of many used around the country

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As local legislators debate facial recognition, some agencies restrict it with their own policies first

As local legislators debate facial recognition, some agencies restrict it with their own policies first

Last month, San Francisco became the first municipality in the country to ban the use of facial recognition by city departments. Later today, Somerville, Massachusetts may join its ranks. Agencies in other cities, however, aren’t waiting for city councils to weigh in, implementing policies that bar the use of facial recognition. Though the agency-level limits are not subject to the public development and enforcement that support city or state-level rules, they can be important measures in an agency’s own relationship with residents.

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