Keith Noreika, acting Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) AND Wells Fargo

Taylor-Scott Amarel filed this request with the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency of the United States of America.
Tracking #

2018-00140-F

Due Dec. 5, 2017
Est. Completion None
Status
Awaiting Response

Communications

From: Taylor-Scott Amarel

To Whom It May Concern:

This is a request under the Freedom of Information Act. I hereby request the following records:

I would like to obtain all records, documents, emails, memos, instructions, directives, or other documents that detail the policies, actions, instructions, or desires of Keith Noreika, acting Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), to make changes or different interpretations to the September 2016 settlement with Wells Fargo. As part of this settlement, incoming Wells Fargo executives can face a vetting from the OCC while severance payouts must be cleared by the OCC and a sister agency, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.

However, according to reports Keith Noreika wants to do away this this process, waive certain checks and procedures, and speed of the severance pay approval or incoming executive approvals.

According to OCC staff, there exists a proposal that would cause departing employees to automatically collect their severance pay if regulators could not finish their reviews within weeks. This proposal is subject to significant debate between Ketih Noreika, OCC staff, and other regulators. Another proposal, that I would like documents on pertain to a similar plan in which the OCC would gain ultimate authority to approve severance payouts, by-passing the FDIC.

To help assist in the searching for these documents, it is suggested that the records would exist in the following areas:

1.) Correspondence between the OCC (primarily Keith Noreika) and current FDIC chief, Martin Gruenberg.
2.) Proposal by the OCC to speed up the reviews of severance payment approvals and setting artificial deadlines. These OCC proposals were communicated to the FDIC who resisted the changes suggested by the OCC.
3.) Correspondence between Keith Noreika and OCC spokesman Bryan Hubbard regarding agency deliberations and proposals.
4.) Similar correspondence in the hands of the OCC that was sent to, copied to, or from Barbara Hagenbaugh, spokeswoman for the FDIC.

These records are know to exist and have been confirmed in the media, by internal sources, and by other regulators. If you need assistance searching for such records please let me know and I can provide a more detailed potential search location or additional information.

The requested documents will be made available to the general public, and this request is not being made for commercial purposes.

In the event that there are fees, I would be grateful if you would inform me of the total charges in advance of fulfilling my request. I would prefer the request filled electronically, by e-mail attachment if available or CD-ROM if not.

Thank you in advance for your anticipated cooperation in this matter. I look forward to receiving your response to this request within 20 business days, as the statute requires.

Sincerely,

Taylor-Scott Amarel

From: Office of the Comptroller of the Currency

A no responsive documents response.

From: Taylor-Scott Amarel

To whom this may concern,

I appeal this determination. Documents MUST exist. The OCC has conceded that these documents exist in statements to the media. Furthermore, the FDIC has confirmed the existence of these documents both in their control and in control of the FDIC.

I would greatly appreciate if you could complete a reasonable search for these documents and let me know how many documents are discovered. If you are not finding any documents, please let me know what actions you have done to search for this information (the FOIA log record, that would likely include emails and correspondence with search staff).

All the best,
Taylor

From: Taylor-Scott Amarel

To whom this may concern,

Could you please provide me with an update to 2018-00140-F and the subsequent appeal that was sent in January.

Thank you,
Taylor Amarel

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